Category Archives: shamless_plug

Librarian humor #sadbatman

We had a book returned to the library this past week that was 36 years overdue. The person, of course, just put it in the bookdrop so we have no idea who had the book. I mean, it’s so old it still has a card in the back stamped with the due date!

I decided that the delinquent patron was, in fact, Batman.

So I made a thing:

sad batman has library fines

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My Instagram was mentioned on YALSA!!!

I was just alerted that my Instagram account was listed in the YALSA blog post “Instagrams, Tumblrs, and Vines, Oh My!“, (posted the day before Christmas, so you might have missed it).

Honestly though, this is beyond cool to me. This is really just my personal Instagram account where I post silly things or things I am proud of and, as you can probably guess, that means I post a lot of pictures from work because I love my job.

Just goes to show that if you are passionate about something, someone will eventually notice and give you a little shout-out! So thank you YALSA blogger!!

I got paid to blog!

I had my first official blog post published on the library’s website last week. It’s all about The Beatles and the library and, of course, me! LOL. 😀

And, bonus, it was picked up by our local newspapers and reposted on their websites. I feel so famous. It’s the little things in life you gotta grab on to, ya know.

And the post begins to answer the question that is the name of this blog so you should probably read it and know me better.

EDIT: Copy+pasting text of the blog here because it seems to have disappeared from the main website!

This month marks the 50th anniversary of The Beatles’ appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show. We will be celebrating their musical legacy at the Severna Park Community Library on Saturday, February 15 at 11 am with crafts, trivia, and, of course, Beatles Rock Band. This is an all-ages event, meant to bring families together for a few hours of rock and roll fun.

The Beatles mean a lot of different things to a lot of different people. For me, they turned out to be not only a musical obsession, but also a gateway into my career as a librarian.

I discovered The Beatles in the early 1990s, when the Anthology aired on television. The documentary piqued my interest in this group of four lads from Liverpool, England. I had heard many of their songs in commercials and covered by other bands. My parents had a couple of Beatles records in their collection, but I wanted to hear everything. Where did I go to find their music, in this time before YouTube and iTunes?

You guessed it – I walked over to the Maryland City at Russett Community Library and began to dig through their CD cabinet. After I had learned all the songs by heart, I ventured into the non-fiction collection and checked out every single book about the Fab Four. I learned to use the new online catalog and requested materials from other branches.  

Then I hit a wall. Several of the books mentioned that John Lennon had written a book back in the 1960s but I couldn’t find it in the catalog. It took a lot of courage for this shy pre-teen to walk up to the Information Desk and ask if it was possible to get a copy of the book. To my amazement, the librarian didn’t scoff or tut at my obsession. She went to a special computer and began searching. A few weeks later, I was able to check out a copy of “A Spaniard in the Works” by John Lennon, published in 1965. I examined it from cover to cover and that was when I saw the barcode on the back from the lending library – it had come from a university in California.

I couldn’t believe it. The librarian had requested this book for me from a library all the way across the country. A whole new world opened up to me. I was in the library all the time, chatting with the staff, finding new things to research. (The Beatles were also a slippery slope into Rock and Roll history, which eventually led me to English and American history). I volunteered at the library over the summer and when I was old enough, I interviewed for a Page position, putting books away for most of high school and through college. After a brief stint working at a radio station in Annapolis, I realized that while I loved music, my true passion was information and getting the right items to help people learn about the things that interested them. I quickly made my way back to the library.

Which is why it seems only fitting that I host a program at my library to celebrate the music and the story of The Beatles. Who knows? Maybe this program will bring someone into the library who has never visited before, someone whose interest in The Beatles will introduce them to all the public library has to offer.

“Wewease the seeecwet weapon!”

(bonus points if you know what movie I’m referencing in the post title)

I’m a geek and I love showing off my fandom pride. I love finding lanyards to wear to work to hold my name badge and, more importantly, stick my geeky buttons to represent a few of my favorite things:

My secret weapons

There have been some wonderful unintended consequences to wearing these buttons!

I wish I could tell you how many kids and teens ask me “Is that a Dalek pin?” while I’m helping them find a book. I’ve lost count. But it gives me a great way to break the ice with them and show them that librarians are people too, and we enjoy some of the same things they do. Talking to a teen about Doctor Who one day can make them feel comfortable approaching you for help on another day.

Same goes for my Mockingjay pin, which I’ve had compliments on from both teens and adults. I love the series and it gives me a chance to talk to them about young adult literature and usually upcoming programs (like our Catching Fire program, coming November 26th, just after the movie is released! Mark you calendars now!)

I also have an R2-D2 (a good way to show street cred to prove to the kids that you really are a Star Wars fan and not an adult pretending to “get it”), and my Greendale College lanyard (which I have retired for awhile because it was starting to get a little bit icky) was another fun one. I had many people ask where Greendale was but I had a few sly “Human Beings” who called me out on it.

I know it may sound silly – of course librarians are people too – but these little things can make you more approachable, take away that aura of “stuffiness” that seems to come with being a Librarian, and also make great conversation starters.

Coming soon – adventures in library promotion: Annapolis Comic-Con

Annapolis Comic-Con June 29

So, this Saturday, I get to attend the local Comic-Con as a representative of the library!

I’m actually pretty excited. Not only will I be paid to attend a convention, these are my people! I can’t wait to share information about the library with them. I feel like this is a group, probably tech savvy, who might not know about the different services we offer for free. And I’m not just talking about the free comic books (which we have) or the fact that we take part in events like Star Wars Reads Day – I’m talking about the plethora of digital services they could access from home, without having to step foot into a library (well, maybe once to get the card).

I found our library “mascot” today and decided I would make him a superhero costume to wear to the event and hopefully get some cosplayers to snap photos with him. I am also going to attempt my first “live-tweeting” on behalf of the library while I am there (@aacpl)

We are even listed on the guests page, which just cracks me up!

Wish me luck! I hope to update again after the event! 🙂